Stories of Changed Lives | Allentown Rescue Mission

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Stories of Changed Lives

Gary was happily married with three sons and a good job. “I thought I had a perfect life,” he says. “But after my kids grew up and moved out, my wife and I didn’t have things in common and we separated.”
"I asked God to take my addiction away..." “On Thanksgiving night, I dropped to my knees. I asked God to take my addiction away because no matter what I did, I couldn’t stop.” 
Shawn was only 17 when his mother died of alcoholism. “I watched her drink herself to death,” he says.  With no other family to lean on, Shawn began using heroin to numb his pain. 
When Kevin began looking for a place where he could really change his life, he knew it had to be a Christian program, and the Allentown Rescue Mission was at the top of the list!
A journey from addiction to restoration Michael grew up without a father in a “crazy” household. He was only nine years old when he began using drugs. “I started smoking pot and moved onto drinking, to pills, LSD, cocaine,” he says.
William took care of his mother every day for 16 years. In addition to working as a Federal Police Officer in Warminster, he shopped for groceries, paid the bills and saw to his mother’s every need.
There’s an old adage attributed to our neighbors, the Pennsylvania Dutch: “The faster I go, the behinder I get.” For years, that would have been the perfect description for Anthony’s life! “I was always working, always productive,” he says. “But also overworked, underpaid and stressed out.”
So many of us are blessed to have friends or family we can depend on in emergencies! We are blessed to have people who will help us out when the going gets rough.
When John began using drugs and drinking at 13, he couldn’t have foreseen that it would lead to a decade of life on the streets, sleeping in the park, and living under bridges.
Tyrone had reached a point in his life where nothing mattered except “the next high or the next bottle.” Growing up in a very strict family and church, he rebelled, becoming “the black sheep of the family.” The drinking and drug use that began in his late teens continued into his later life and brought nothing but trouble.

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